Tad D. Fallon, Principal

 

Tad D. Fallon, left, was raised in the antiques business in upstate New York and worked within the family business, Copake Auctions Inc., before college. Mr. Fallon entered the Fashion Institute of Technology’s Restoration program in New York City and studied furniture restoration. After graduation from FIT with a BFA in 1993, he was employed by Sotheby’s Restoration, where he was a supervisor in the Polishing Department. In 1995, Mr. Fallon left Sotheby’s to pursue courses in chemistry, a prerequisite for conservation graduate training, while simultaneously opening a private restoration company, Tad D. Fallon Antique Restorations, in Copake, New York. In 1996, Mr. Fallon was accepted to the Smithsonian Institution’s four year Furniture Conservation Training Program. After completing training at the Smithsonian, Mr. Fallon served a year-long graduate internship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation. Mr. Fallon holds a certificate of completion from the Smithsonian Institution and an MA in Conservation from Antioch University, in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Tad Fallon and Randy Wilkinson (Left: Tad D. Fallon - Right: Randy S. Wilkinson)

 

In 2000, Mr. Fallon joined Smithsonian classmate Randy Wilkinson to open the private conservation practice Fallon & Wilkinson, LLC. Mr. Fallon frequently lectures and writes about conservation. He was a participant in the 2001 “Furniture in France” study tour, sponsored by the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works (AIC), and is an active member of the AIC Wooden Artifacts Group.


Randy S. Wilkinson, Principal

 

Mr. Wilkinson was born and raised in Baltic, Connecticut. He attended the University of New Haven and received a BS in Electrical Engineering in 1988. After college, he gave up engineering and decided to follow a dream by opening a business building 18th and 19th century reproduction furniture. During his first years in business, he was often asked to repair antiques. Seeing the need to learn more about furniture restoration, he was accepted in the Smithsonian Institution’s Furniture Conservation Training Program in 1996. He spent four years in training, receiving his MA from Antioch University, in Yellow Springs, Ohio. He completed internships at the Preservation Society of Newport County, in Newport, Rhode Island, and the Mystic Seaport Museum, in Mystic, Connecticut.

 

Now, 20 years later, Mr. Wilkinson’s work is represented in museums and private collections throughout the country. He blends his love for building outstanding examples of America’s best furniture with conserving some of our national treasures. In 2000, Mr. Wilkinson joined forces with Smithsonian classmate Tad D. Fallon and opened the private conservation practice Fallon & Wilkinson, LLC. Mr. Wilkinson frequently lectures and writes about conservation and woodworking. He is a member of the Wooden Artifacts Group of the American Institute for Conservation (AIC), and participated in the 2001 “Furniture in France” study tour. For the two-year period of 2005-2006, he was the Wooden Artifacts Group Chair. He is a Professional Associate with the AIC.

 

 

Rian M. H. Deurenberg-Wilkinson, Associate Conservator

 

Rian Deurenberg was born and raised in the Netherlands. She trained for four years at the furniture conservation program at the Netherlands Institute for Cultural Heritage (ICN) in Amsterdam, formerly the Opleiding Restauratoren. She spent internships at the Amsterdams Historisch Museum and at the private firm of Bruys Meubelrestauratie in Amsterdam. Her thesis focused on the possibilities for straightening warped wood in furniture. Her first commission after graduation in 2001 was the reproduction of an early 18th century carved frame for the Roomsch Catholiek Oude-Armenkantoor, a charitable institution in Amsterdam.

 

In 2002, Rian moved to the United States to work as a post-graduate fellow with a private firm in Brooklyn, NY, concentrating on Herter Brothers and Leon Marcotte furniture of the 19th century. During a three-year Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, she worked on a wide range of furniture and took the opportunity to hone her research skills on adhesive tensile strength testing and upholstery issues.

 

Most recently, Rian held a two-year position as an Assistant Conservator in the Sherman Fairchild Center for Objects Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Here she worked mainly on painted neoclassical furniture for the reinstallation and renovation of the American Wing. She performed cross-sectional stratification analysis, reduced multiple previous restoration layers, and inpainted losses on a set of four well-known painted klismos chairs, attributed to the Finlay Brothers of Baltimore, MD.

Rian is an active member of the Wooden Artifacts Group (WAG) and a Professional Associate with the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC). She was the 2007 WAG Program Chair.